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is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
and saying that a ceasefire will be announced in cairo this evening. israeli radio reporting that the ceasefire could be declared during secretary clinton's visit to jerusalem. she left from southeast asia where she has been traveling with the president. her diplomatic mission is the most direct engagement yet in these negotiations. >> her visits will build on the engagement that we've undertaken over the last several days including the engagement by president obama and secretary clinton with leaders in the region and to support a de-escalation of the violence. >> president obama himself was on the phone in the early hours of the morning trying to prevent the conflict from escalating into a ground war. explosions and smoke clouds dotted the skyline in gaza again as soon as the sun was up. more than 100 people are now confirmed dead there with dozens of children among those killed. more rockets from gaza landing in southern israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
. >> nbc's stephanie gosk is in tel aviv, ayman mohyeldin in gaza, jim maceda in cairo. let's ask jim maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demand
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
option would be a ground invasion, tamron. >> martin, thank you very much. in cairo today thousands gather to protest the gaza air strikes demanding that the egyptian government cut ties with israel. that's a development in the region. let's bring in "time" magazine international editor jim frederick. you heard the reports with me. martin fletcher indicating that perhaps not even net uh-hy neta anyone knows what the next phase will be? >> the next 48 hours are critical because the deputy foreign minister basically threatened hamas. you might have a ground offensive. the very important thing to keep our eye on over the next 48 hours is that yippian president morsi is meeting with the prime minister from turkey. they're meeting in cairo. these are two crucial countries. on one hand you have -- they're both large populations. historic allally they're wester friendly. they're anchors between israel and their neighbors. he's probably the most distinguished and elder statementsmen in the region, and morsi is new and democratically elected and trying to make his mark as a statesman himself
to meet with leaders in jerusalem as well as cairo and ramallah. few details have been provided in a news conference an hour ago. >> we are all hoping for a deescalation and we are all hoping for restoration of calm, and we are all hoping to open space, for deeper, broader conversations. >> now, the death and the destruction caused by the crisis stretches across both borders. more than 100 confirmed killed in gaza. four in israel including an israeli soldier who died in a rocket strike today. we want to get more from nbc correspondent, ayman mohyeldin, who joins me from gaza. you reached out to the egyptian authorities about what's taking place, when this deal will be announced. what are you hearing about the possibility of that happening this hour? >> well, right now what we're hearing from egyptian officials is that they're still working to finalize that agreement. there are some areas where the gap between the two sides has been narrowed, but there are still some very important issues that have not been addressed. you know, we are talking about trying to solve one of the most complex i
will be flying to cairo where she will meet egypt's president. many hoped a truce would go into effect last night. it did not. gaza felt like a war zone throughout the evening. a lot is riding on the secretary's visit. >> ayman mohyeldin, thank you very much. >>> we want to go to the mayor of jerusalem. he joins us live from jerusalem over the phone. we want to thank you for the time joining us. we just mentioned the secretary of stated spending there with prime minister netanyahu in jerusalem yet, working to broker some kind of a deal, a cease-fire. how confident are you that this can even happen? >> it's very clear that it's short-term since the leadership of the hamas believes, like osama bin laden and al qaeda in death and destruction and their charter is to destroy israel. it's difficult to broker a deal with somebody that wants to kill you and they're not changing their charter. the challenge here is how do we make sure the hamas leadership understands that their motivation should be zero, very negative motivation to try and shoot indiscriminate fire on israeli civilians. >> so how far are
fire in this critical part of the world? she's going to cairo, to egypt because everybody is counting on them. they are indispensable. the president is finishing his trip in the far east and he's kept up his schedule of public events and appearances there but he's been doing some diplomacy personally. "the new york times" reporting that the president spent last night up until 2:30 in the morning making one-on-one direct phone calls with the israeli prime minister and also not the head of hamas, not the palestinian authority, but the president of egypt, which for a generation was our ally in the region, even though it was a creepy and repressive dictatorship. now that country, that crucial nation in this critical part of the world has a whole new face and maybe a whole new character in terms of its international responsibilities. nobody knows if this effort by them to broker a ceasefire is going to work. but it seems almost as important for the region, for the world, for us, frankly, that if a cease fire is going to come from anywhere, it looks like it's going to come from there. joini
was certainly in sky r cairo and tunisia and other places. is this partly a victim of what's happened for the arab spring, the impetus for change has moved on? >> i don't think it necessarily has to do with the arab spring really. to be honest with you, what's been lacking is courage of leadership. we've seen in the international level, international diplomatic level, large agreements on what needs to be done to move this situation forward except for the united states which has played unfortunately a very obstructive role in international forums, objecting to, you know, preventing israeli settlement expansion when it comes to moving, you know, the negotiations forward and so on. so, you know, we need to could some soul searching here in washington to -- about what role we can play. the first and most important thing i think we can do is tell both sides, particularly now the israelis who we have connections with, that this needs to stop immediately. >> but finally how can you get the hamas to guarantee that the rockets will stop firing towards jerusalem and tel aviv? >> if you look at
by the protests at the u.s. embassy in cairo and evolved into a direct assault against the u.s. post in benghazi and subsequently its annex. the last thing is the investigation is ongoing and the u.s. government is working with the libyan authorities to bring to justice those responsible for the deaths of u.s. citizens. that's reality. >> conspiracy, conspiracy, conspiracy. >> the president's most passionate moment of the week is his moment when he was defending susan rice in the press conference. he seemed like i'm standing up to a bully. he stepped out of that professorial aloof poos tour we sometimes think he's in. he seemed very animated. >> he was exactly the same in that presidential debate when he is accused of not labeling this a terrorist attack and he was fuming again in front of mitt romney. >> you want a problem come to me because i'm the problem, not the u.n. ambassador. but by the way, john mccain who wants to challenge susan rice's probity in these sort of things, where was he when they did the classified hearing about benghazi yesterday? he couldn't make it because he had a previ
this is the epicenter of the violence that is taking place, all eyes are in cairo, egypt. the head of egypt's intelligence has met with lead others palestinian factions. they say they're committed to a ceasefire under two conditions. one is that israel promises or at least pledges or guarantees that it will not resume targeted assassination and the deliberate killing of palestinian leaders and a lifting of the blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006, which has restricted the free movement of people and goods and has really created a humanitarian crisis here. so they want to see that siege lifted. the egyptian, we understand, are expected to or may have actually communicated that to the israelis. and so it is now dependent on whether or not they can get the two sides to a cessation of hostilities, and when that time frame would unfold. so there is still no clear official timeline or clear answer, and no clear commitment from either side. but those interest demands as we understand them as they are being negotiated from the palestinian side. >> all right. live in gaza, tha
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
normal force. >>> and we have brand-new video from cairo where the arab league is holding emergency meetings on the crisis. also today the white house urged diplomacy and a deescalation in the violence. let's get right to it on the ground and inside gaza where rockets are flying overhead. nbc's news correspondent is there for us live. let's get to what's happening right up now around you. >> reporter: well let's start off here with the situation in gaza. right now it is really quiet behind me. the streets of gaza are really empty. most people this time of night go to their homes. the streets are pretty much quiet. people here really bracing themselves for what the night usually brings. what we've seen over the course of the last several nights is an intense aerial campaign by the israeli forces. as you mentioned yesterday, the palestinian prime minister's office was destroyed. these air strikes will be intensifying in the coming hours. that's been the pattern. there's also been palestinian rocket fire coming out of gaza into southern israel. the fear that grips the people here is on
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)